Volkswagen Experts | The Boneyard

Volkswagen Experts

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I know a kid who has a chance to buy a 2017 Passat .I’m assuming lower model with 112,000 miles on it relatively ($12K )inexpensively
I’m a Toyota guy and my understanding is even the Turbo 4 cylinder is pretty much done at 100,000. I understand German car repairs tend to be pricy.
They can’t afford expensive repairs but need a vehicle to get to work.
If it was a Camry , or Accord , Civic , or Corolla it’s still in the break stage. But I’m uncertain on VW durability.
Good or Bad idea
 
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Wife had a Tiguan....our mechanic was not a fan. I know VW/Audi have issues at about 100k if they use a timing belt instead of a chain. Her tiguan had a plastic intake manifold that went right after the warranty period.

When we were looking for another vehicle...I said anything but a VW or Audi.

If you want reliability can't beat Honda or Toyota IMO
 
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Wife had a Tiguan....our mechanic was not a fan. I know VW/Audi have issues at about 100k if they use a timing belt instead of a chain. Her tiguan had a plastic intake manifold that went right after the warranty period.

When we were looking for another vehicle...I said anything but a VW or Audi.

If you want reliability can't beat Honda or Toyota IMO
2017 Passat is a chain. Most recent cars will be chains. I will say the Toyota/Honda point is kind of dated nowadays. Plenty of American, Korean, etc car manufacturers have basically closed the gap on reliability. The vast majority of modern engines should give you 175k+ miles IF maintained appropriately.
 
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Maintenance on German cars is more expensive than most other makes. And you have to take them to mechanics that work on German cars. I would never recommend any used German vehicle unless it has an extensive maintenance history.
 
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I know a kid who has a chance to buy a 2017 Passat .I’m assuming lower model with 112,000 miles on it relatively ($12K )inexpensively
I’m a Toyota guy and my understanding is even the Turbo 4 cylinder is pretty much done at 100,000. I understand German car repairs tend to be pricy.
They can’t afford expensive repairs but need a vehicle to get to work.
If it was a Camry , or Accord , Civic , or Corolla it’s still in the break stage. But I’m uncertain on VW durability.
Good or Bad idea
I would stay away. My Passat was fine for about a year and then it was a disaster. My mechanic kept telling me to sell the car because they're pieces of cr@p. I finally sold it years ago after dumping way too much money into it. Don't buy German, buy Japanese or Korean.
 

CL82

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I know a kid who has a chance to buy a 2017 Passat .I’m assuming lower model with 112,000 miles on it relatively ($12K )inexpensively
I’m a Toyota guy and my understanding is even the Turbo 4 cylinder is pretty much done at 100,000. I understand German car repairs tend to be pricy.
They can’t afford expensive repairs but need a vehicle to get to work.
If it was a Camry , or Accord , Civic , or Corolla it’s still in the break stage. But I’m uncertain on VW durability.
Good or Bad idea
Take a look at this

I find it helpful tool when looking at used cars. Of course, nothing replaces having a mechanic evaluate the specific vehicle.
 
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112k on a 2017?
That’s ~22k yr and 2020 would have been <10k year probably, so 25k a/yr

Unless they change oil @ the correct intervals and used 93 octane, I’d pass. You don’t want a used turbo’d car.

Like others said, unless u got receipts for past service, I’d bail

You’re buying someone else’s problem. Or at least, problems will start and now you’re paying.
 
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2017 Passat is a chain. Most recent cars will be chains. I will say the Toyota/Honda point is kind of dated nowadays. Plenty of American, Korean, etc car manufacturers have basically closed the gap on reliability. The vast majority of modern engines should give you 175k+ miles IF maintained appropriately.
Agree on the Korean cars....had a Genesis and now have a Telluride..no problems with either. Her TT was belt...but that was a while ago. I was SHOCKED when I found out her Tiguan had a plastic intake manifold....who the hell makes engine parts out of plastic if they want it to last
 
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112k on a 2017?
That’s ~22k yr and 2020 would have been <10k year probably, so 25k a/yr

Unless they change oil @ the correct intervals and used 93 octane, I’d pass. You don’t want a used turbo’d car.

Like others said, unless u got receipts for past service, I’d bail

You’re buying someone else’s problem. Or at least, problems will start and now you’re paying.

Unless you're buying a truck that has a turbo diesel - then you want to buy it all day long - as long as it hasn't been chipped.
 
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112k on a 2017?
That’s ~22k yr and 2020 would have been <10k year probably, so 25k a/yr

Unless they change oil @ the correct intervals and used 93 octane, I’d pass. You don’t want a used turbo’d car.

Like others said, unless u got receipts for past service, I’d bail

You’re buying someone else’s problem. Or at least, problems will start and now you’re paying.
The turbo 4 in that car takes regular gas, so someone having used 93 octane would make no difference. The oil change comment is very fair though. That's a risk you'll take with any used car without service records.
 
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Wife had a Tiguan....our mechanic was not a fan. I know VW/Audi have issues at about 100k if they use a timing belt instead of a chain. Her tiguan had a plastic intake manifold that went right after the warranty period.

When we were looking for another vehicle...I said anything but a VW or Audi.

If you want reliability can't beat Honda or Toyota IMO
A German friend of ours actually worked as an engineer in a VW plant over there and still maintains his VWs for friends as a side gig. He says anything made since 2000 is pure crap (FWIW, he was especially derogatory about the Atlas).
 
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I currently own a 2015 Passat SE and a 2019 Tiguan SEL Premium, I find Volkswagens to be great cars. Always purchase certified pre owned from a VW Dealer.

I Have owned many VWs over the past 20 years and find them extremely reliable. I purchase certified pre owned and have them services at the dealer.

My 2015 Passat has 125,000 miles, zero issues and runs great.
 
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I've owned 3 Volkswagens. They are incredibly reliable if you take care of them properly and will be on the road for a long time.

Their 4 cylinder turbo's especially. So long as you aren't red-lining it constantly.

I had:

2006 Jetta GLI (sold it) but ran great

Currently Have:

2004 Jetta GLI (my baby, currently garaged at the moment - will probably take it out in summer for a couple of months). I've done a ton of work to this car myself. Tuned, straight downpipe, upgraded turbo inlet, diverter valve - all the fun stuff. What a joy to drive. Has 125,000 and runs like a champ. Plan on doing some more work/turbo upgrade to it at some point down the line.

2009 Jetta SE (2.5 - NA). I have 188,000 on this car and it drives like I just drove it off the lot. Upgraded big brakes on the front, seasonal snow tires and summer wheels. I am a bit of a control freak when it comes to maintenance (oil every 2k) but since doing an oil change myself costs about the same as a 1/4 tank of gas, F it. I expect this car to last me for many years to come. It's my daily driver.

Wife Has:

2021 Tiguan SE-R line. Gorgeous car, 4 cy turbo. Giant sunroof. Incredible leg room, can fit 3 big dudes in the backseat and be perfectly comfortable. Drives like a dream.

4 Cylinder turbo's in general get a bad rep, from the early years where they weren't as dependable. But the tech has come a long way, that Passat if properly taken care of will last well past 200k. Plus if you go get an ECU tune you can add another 25-35 HP. It'll void a warranty on a new car, but given this passat has 112k on it I don't suspect that would be an issue.

just an FYI I am not as familiar with the passat's. My uncle has one, but it's the 2.5 inline 5 cylinder. I know some of the 4th and 5th gens had some issues with their V6. But that was ages ago. The German's make a darn fine vehicle.

High maintenance costs for german cars are generally siloed to BMW and some of the other 'overly engineered luxury lines'. I find it incredibly easy to work on mine and do almost all the work myself.
 
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Agree on the Korean cars....had a Genesis and now have a Telluride..no problems with either. Her TT was belt...but that was a while ago. I was SHOCKED when I found out her Tiguan had a plastic intake manifold....who the hell makes engine parts out of plastic if they want it to last
Plastic intake manifolds have been common for 20 years now. Can't think of a single engine off the top of my head that doesn't have a plastic intake manifold today.

Plastic is smooth. Smoother than any cast part will ever be. Smooth intake = better airflow = better explosions = better power and efficiency.
 

Dove

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I know a kid who has a chance to buy a 2017 Passat .I’m assuming lower model with 112,000 miles on it relatively ($12K )inexpensively
I’m a Toyota guy and my understanding is even the Turbo 4 cylinder is pretty much done at 100,000. I understand German car repairs tend to be pricy.
They can’t afford expensive repairs but need a vehicle to get to work.
If it was a Camry , or Accord , Civic , or Corolla it’s still in the break stage. But I’m uncertain on VW durability.
Good or Bad idea
AZ...I have many coworkers who have had VWs. They never bought one again due to repair costs.
 
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The 2017 is probably the most reliable year of production over the past 10-15 years

In the reliability report engine (major and minor), engine cooling, transmission (major and minor), drive system, fuel system, electrical, suspension, exhaust are all rated as much better than average (highest rating)

Everything else is rated as better than average with only power equipment and in car electrical being rated average.

Overall reliability score is better than average but as has been mentioned oil changes and a good maintenance record are key.
 
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Plastic intake manifolds have been common for 20 years now. Can't think of a single engine off the top of my head that doesn't have a plastic intake manifold today.

Plastic is smooth. Smoother than any cast part will ever be. Smooth intake = better airflow = better explosions = better power and efficiency.
wow...that's surprising....Turns out VW switched back to Aluminum a year or two after our Tiguan year.


I don't design car engines..nor do I know much about high temperature polymers, but seems to me it's just a cost cutting issue. why don't they make engine blocks out of plastic if they are so good?
 
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I had owned nothing but Japanese cars, then treated myself to a brand new 2012 Audi Q5 2.0T with all the toys. Beautiful for a SUV, handled like a sedan, good pick up, nice features. My dad was a mechanic, so I learned to maintain cars early on. Between 20k & 30k the water pump went. Audi service said, "Yeah. They go." I had never replaced a water pump and put 188k, 94k, and 156k on my previous Japanese cars and another 100k on a Saab. Across 500k plus miles, I had only ever had to do oil/filter changes and replace wipers, headlights, tires, and brakes plus one heater core and one wheel bearing. The 188k car (5 speed) had the original clutch.

Around 90k, I noticed the Q5 had started to burn oil. I was going through a quart every 2k miles. Pretty sure the head was warped. I nursed it another 30k before swapping it for a Toyota.

As much as I like Porsches, no more VW products for me. And don't get me started on my wife's BMW.
 
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wow...that's surprising....Turns out VW switched back to Aluminum a year or two after our Tiguan year.


I don't design car engines..nor do I know much about high temperature polymers, but seems to me it's just a cost cutting issue. why don't they make engine blocks out of plastic if they are so good?
Lol because engine blocks are literally containing explosions. All the intake does is let air pass into the engine.
 
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wow...that's surprising....Turns out VW switched back to Aluminum a year or two after our Tiguan year.


I don't design car engines..nor do I know much about high temperature polymers, but seems to me it's just a cost cutting issue. why don't they make engine blocks out of plastic if they are so good?
Intake manifolds are not really a high-temp area. The actual flange/gasket to the engine will take some moderate heat but nothing that a well-designed part wouldn't easily be able to handle. Cheaper and easier manufacturing, lighter, cheaper to replace. It's sort of a slam dunk part to be plastic. As long as you aren't smashing it with a hammer, shouldn't be any issues with that lasting the life of the car.
 

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